Stinging Nettle

STINGING NETTLE - Urtica Dioica
For centuries Nettle has been known as a nutritive spring tonic, blood builder and blood cleanser.
Nettles nourish and support the entire body, particularly the endocrine, immune, urinary, respiratory, and circulatory systems. Nettle root is a kidney ally and lymphatic/immune strengthener.
Rich in iron, magnesium, calcium, chromium, zinc, potassium, phosphorus and silicone as well as vitamins A, B2, C, E and K it’s an all-round tonic to boost strength and immunity.
Devil's Apron, Naughty Man's Plaything, Hoky-poky, Jenny-nettle, Sting-leaf, Devil's Leaf, just some of the common names of this legendary herb, most commonly known as Stinging Nettle. Latin name Urtica Dioica.
Nettle is legendary with many believing that a bunch of freshly cut nettles placed under a person's sick bed helps to facilitate a rapid recovery. Others believe that carried in the hand nettles ward off ghosts and evil spirits, or that dried and sprinkled around the home nettle keeps out evil spirits. Nettle has also been used to guard against lightning strikes, which is ironic given Nettles own sting.
Nettle was used by the Romans to increase blood circulation, quite literally a patient was spread out on a table and whipped with Stinging Nettle, the aggravating hairs causing the patients circulation to be stimulated....
Recipes abound for Nettle Soup. I also love it in a nourishing, bright green herbal tea.

I like to use Nettle in my haircare for it's reputation to reduce dandruff & itching, stimulate hair growth through increased blood circulation, which therefore brings more nutrients and oxygen to the hair folliciles. Nettle is even touted as preventing grey hair (however unfortunately I have not seen that result myself!! it's worth a try though right?).

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